Reflections on Harry Potter, A History of Magic and Fantasy

The British Library created an exhibition on Harry Potter (with focus on the books, not the movies) called A History of Magic, but for those of us who won’t be going to London anytime soon, they also produced two books about the exhibition: Harry Potter, A History of Magic and Harry Potter, A Journey Through a History of Magic, with the latter being shorter than the former. A History of Magic is a deeper look at the exhibition, and everything in the Journey Through version is in the longer version (at least as far as I could tell).

The exhibition isn’t just of Harry Potter books or items directly related to the series. Instead, the exhibition has a broader scope that focuses on various historical artifacts that fit into the mythology behind the series. For example, there are artifacts about witches and basilisks and the like. It provides an interesting look at the mythology that has existed over centuries in Europe and which influenced J.K. Rowling while writing Harry Potter.

As someone who loves Harry Potter, history, and literature, I found these books fascinating. (I’m sure I’d find the exhibition itself even more fascinating if I was able to go.) Everyone knows that the Harry Potter series has a firm footing in stories that had already been told for centuries, and it wouldn’t exist without that history. These books and, I’m sure, the exhibition itself highlight that in a wonderful way by showing these real historical artifacts and connecting them back to the series.

I particularly loved how both books were divided into chapters based on Hogwarts subjects, such as Transfiguration and Potions, as this showed how deeply ingrained each subject is in European mythology despite being fantasy.

This rich connection to older stories shows the most magical part of Harry Potter, I think. I love fantasy. It will always be my favorite genre, and this deep connection to previous fantasy stories is what makes fantasy so rich. That connection doesn’t need to be to European mythology like Harry Potter is. Every part of the world has its own stories that fantasy can draw upon and be just as rich. But that connection to the past is something unique to fantasy I believe. Even with historical fiction (which I also love), it’s not exactly the same. That genre has a direct connection with the hard facts of the past, while fantasy has a direct connection with the stories we’ve been telling for centuries.

Harry Potter will always be special when it comes to literature, but every fantasy world I create and write about is an attempt to forge the same rich connection to the past that Harry Potter achieved. There’s always room for new ideas and innovation in fantasy, but I want to create stories that are just as richly connected to past stories as Harry Potter is.

My past attempts at fantasy were nowhere close, something that I couldn’t help but ruminate on as I flipped through these books and something that’s been on my mind since. It’s not an easy task, creating a world like Harry Potter, but one day, I hope to come somewhere close.